Read ‘Roar’ Before Your Next Period, Then Hide it From Yourself Until Menopause

food, eat, fuel, Roar, women, endurance athletes

Book Review ROAR: How to match your food and fitness to your female physiology for optimum performance, great health, and a strong, lean body for life. Ladies, the next time you are worried about the timing of your period for a race—or game or outdoor adventure—pick up a copy of Roar. Author Stacy Sims, Ph.D.,

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Hey Flagstaff! 10 reasons why you should race the #Grizzly100 with Artec and me next year

100 miles in Big Bear Lake

During the summer I refuse to leave Flagstaff’s 7,000-foot oasis to visit certain places. Phoenix is first on my list of “oh hell no” destinations. Southern California–especially the inland part of southern California–is next on my list. If given the choice, why would anyone subject themselves to places like Needles and Barstow when you could drive

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Telluride 100 – How I Threw the Pain Cave Under the Bus

You’re going to hate me for saying this. The Telluride 100 climbs 14,000 feet up and over some of the biggest mountain passes in Colorado and my body didn’t hurt during any of it. A half mile from the top of Last Dollar Pass, no more than 30 minutes from the finish line, I started

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Why the Arizona Endurance Series is Rad (Or, my Chance to Spray About Finishing the Picketpost Punisher)

Mountain Bike, Arizona Endurance Series, Picket Post Mountain, Picket Post Punisher, Saguaro Cactus

Grassroots mountain bike racing is the shit. No entry fees. No cut off times. No schwag bags filled with a million advertisements that spill all over your car, get stepped on with muddy cleats, and make it even harder to find that one thing you really need just minutes before the start of the race. No hypoxic dudes trying to run you over at the start because you are a woman and–because they are not a woman–they know they must be faster than you. No bizarre rules like”anyone caught peeing in public will be disqualified” or mass starts where you are forced into a conga line and unable to pass for the first three miles.

Bicycles as Agents of Change

Biking on the beach

Sometimes, I roll into mountain bike races–and even trailheads–wondering why I am a part of such an entitled, capitalist-driven, expensive sport. I loathe the sight of gas guzzling SUVs (especially when only one bicycle and one person emerge from the SUV), and camping near shiny RVs the size of an average house (complete with loud

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Mountain Biking in “The Most Patriotic City in America” and “The Indian Capital of the World”

I was in Gallup, New Mexico recently for a mountain bike race, and when a mass of shiny Toyota Tundras with $8,000 mountain bikes in tow descend upon the town, the town’s poverty (by American standards, at least) is pretty apparent. The image of “have” and “have not” is striking: $50,000 trucks and Sprinter vans

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